Monthly Archives: April 2016

How Narcicissts Use The Courts To Continue Their Abuse, by Christine Hammond, MS, LMHC

“As if the abusive marriage, relationship or business partnership wasn’t bad enough, the narcissist has to escalate the matter by threatening legal action. The legal system becomes an unknowing and unwilling extension of the narcissistic arm reaching out to cause as much damage as possible. Their take no prisoners’ attitude stops at nothing to seek revenge for causing pain over some perceived embarrassment.”

How Narcicissists Use The Courts To Continue Their Abuse

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How To Leave An Emotionally Abusive Partner, by Annie Kaszina

How to leave an emotionally abusive partner is something most abuse sufferers do not think through carefully enough. Rather, they spend painful months and years wondering what they can do to move on from all the awfulness, and how they can possibly stay-  instead of thinking about how to leave an emotionally partner safely and well.

How To Leave An Emotionally Abusive Partner

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Vengeful Father Syndrome

“Forcibly taking a mother’s children, and then controlling her emotionally by withholding contact must be publicly recognized as one of the greatest forms of ‘mis-use’ of the American justice system and one of the greatest hidden vehicles for wide-spread socially approved physical and emotional abuse and control.”  Coral Anika Theill

Vengeful Father Syndrome

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Love And Stockholm Syndrome: The Mystery of Loving An Abuser, Dr. Joseph M. Carver, PhD

If you’re in a controlling and abusive relationship, you may recognize several of the characteristics described in this article by Consulting Clinical Psychologist Dr Joseph M. Carver, PhD. Beginning with a description of how bonds form between victim and abuser, the article continues with observations about cognitive dissonance and offers suggestions for friends and family of victims.  Love And Stockholm Syndrome: The Mystery of Loving An Abuser, Page 1

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Rethinking Charm, Lundy Bancroft

As a society, we place a high value on charm; when we meet new people, we love it if they are very quickly smooth, funny, entertaining, and flattering. We are charmed when they seem immediately ready to jump into doing favors for us. We love confidence, lively story-telling, and a sharp personal appearance.

And it all can be bad news.

http://lundybancroft.blogspot.com/2012/02/rethinking-charm.html